Dan Walsh: container_t versus svirt_lxc_net_t

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For some reason recently I have been asked via email and twitter about what the difference is between the container_t type and the svirt_lxc_net_t type. Or similarly between container_file_t and svirt_sandbox_file_t.  Bottom line, NOTHING.  They are aliases of each other.

In SELinux policy language they have a typealias  command.

typealias container_t alias svirt_lxc_net_t;

typealias container_file_t alias svirt_sandbox_file_t;

When I first started working on containers and SELinux prior to Docker, we were writing a tool called virt-sandbox that used libvirt to launch containers, specifically it used libvirt-lxc.  We had labeled all of the VMs launched by libvirt, svirt_t.  This stood for secure virt.  When I decided to write policy for the libvirt_lxc containers, I created a type called svirt_lxc_t.  This type was not allowed to do network access, so I added another type called svirt_lxc_net_t that had full network access.  The type for content that he svirt_lxc types could manage as svirt_sandbox_file_t.  (svirt_file_t was already used for virtual machine images.)  Why I did not call it svirt_lxc_file_t, I don’t know. 

When Docker exploded on the scene we quickly adapted the SELinux policy we had written for virt-sandbot to work with Docker and that is how these types got associated with containers.  After a few years of using this and constantly telling people that svirt_lxc_net_t was the type of a container process, I figured it was time to change the type name.  I created container_t and container_file_t and then just aliased the old names to the new.  

One problem was that RHEL policy updated much slower and we were not able to get these changes in untile RHEL7.5 (Or maybe RHEL7.4, I don’t remember).   But for now on we will use the new type names.  

Google Memory

One issue you have with technology is the old howto’s and information out on the internet never goes away.  If someone googles how to label a volume so that it works with a container and SELinux, they are likely to get told to label the content svirt_sandbox_file_t.

This is not an issue with the type aliases.  If you have scripts or customer policy modules that use the old names you are fine. Since the old names will still work. 

But I would prefer that everyone just use the newer easily understandable types.

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Amitosh Swain Mahapatra: GSoC 2018: Week 1

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This time, I am working on improving the Fedora Community App with the Fedora project. It’s been a week since we started off our coding on may 14.

The Fedora App is a central location for Fedora users and innovators to stay updated on The Fedora Project. News updates, social posts, Ask Fedora, as well as articles from Fedora Magazine are all held under this app.

Progress Report

Here is the summary of my work in the first week:

  1. We now have a system for loading configuration such as API keys, depending on the environment we are running. It also allows us to load them from external sources (#55). This would help us to remove the need to store API keys under version control (#52).
  2. The JS to TS conversion I started earlier (#4, #6) is finally complete. All of our code is now fully checked by TypeScript (TS) compiler for type safety (#54, #56). Except for JSON responses, where typing things will be a waste of time as TS does not provide run-time type safety, all other functions and services are now checked using TS interfaces. (#57).
  3. Our code is now following Angular patterns even more closely. I have standardized the Providers who use to return a callback or a Promise to return Observables. We now load network data a bit faster due to improved concurrency in the code.
  4. The documentation coverage of our code has increased. As the part of conversion, I have added TS doc comments describing the usage of various Providers, Services and Components, what the expect and what they return.
  5. The annoying white screen on launch (#16) in certain devices is now gone! (#47)
  6. After the restructuring, we no longer have any in-memory caching. I will be working on offline storage and caching implementation in this week.

What’s next ?

I am working to bring offline storage and sync to Fedora Magazine and Fedora Social sections of the app. This will both improve the usability and performance of the app. From a UX perspective, we will start syncing data rather than blocking the user from doing anything.

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ABRT team: Java exceptions from container

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As you know from a previous blog post, lately we have been dealing with
catching unhandled exceptions from inside of containers.

In this blog post, we would like to introduce a new language we are
capable of doing that for. The language is JAVA.

We’ve taken ABRT’s tool abrt-java-connector which catches java’s exceptions
and we’ve added a new option cel there. The cel option turns on writing
exceptions to container-exception-logger. For more information about
abrt-java-connector options see abrt-java-connector readme.
Also, a new package abrt-java-connector-container was released. It contains
a minimal set of files needed for container exception logging.

How to make it work in a container

If you use executables which load /usr/share/java-utils/java-functions file
(for instance will_java_throw shipped by package will-crash), you only need
to have package abrt-java-connector-container installed. This is default in
Fedora.

Content of will_java_throw executable:

$ cat /usr/bin/will_java_throw
 #!/bin/sh
 MAIN_CLASS="WontCatchNullPointerException"
 export MAIN_CLASS
 . /usr/share/java-utils/java-functions
 set_classpath "willcrash/willuncaught.jar"
 run

In other cases you have to load shared native library (.so)
/usr/lib/abrt-java-connector/libabrt-java-connector.so into VM using either
-agentlib or -agentpath command line parameter. The first
parameter requires the library’s file name and works only if the library is
placed in one of the ld searched directories or a directory included in
LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable. The latter command line argument works
with an arbitrary, valid absolute path pointing to the library.

$ java -agentlib:abrt-java-connector=cel=on $MyClass -platform.jvmtiSupported true

For more information see abrt-java-connector readme.

Example (exception in container -> host’s systemd journal log)

Inside of container:
[root@049e3e4b7233 tmp]# will_java_throw
Can't open '/usr/share/abrt/conf.d/plugins/java.conf': No such file or directory
Can't open '/etc/abrt/plugins/java.conf': No such file or directory
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NullPointerException
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:30)
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.die(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:21)
	at WontCatchNullPointerException.main(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:38)
Host’s systemd journal:
# journalctl -f
May 22 14:40:19 localhost.localdomain dockerd-current[972]:
container-exception-logger - {"type": "Java", "executable":
"/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar", "reason": "Uncaught exception
java.lang.NullPointerException in method
WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard()", "backtrace": "Exception in thread
"main" java.lang.NullPointerExceptionn        at
WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:30)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n
at
WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n
at
WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n
at
WontCatchNullPointerException.die_hard(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:33)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n
at WontCatchNullPointerException.die(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:21)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n
at WontCatchNullPointerException.main(WontCatchNullPointerException.java:38)
[jar:file:/usr/share/java/willcrash/willuncaught.jar!/WontCatchNullPointerException.class]n",
"uid": "0", "abrt-java-connector": "1.1.1-3ec4e6c"}

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Fedora Community Blog: Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F28 Final

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Let’s look at some testing stats for Fedora 28 Final!

Hello testers, hope you’re ready for some stats concerning the release of Fedora 28 Final! The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. So, without further ado, let’s get started!

Updates Testing

Test period: Fedora 28 Final (2018-04-17 – 2018-05-01)
Testers: 117
Comments1: 785

Name Updates commented
Dmitri Smirnov (cserpentis) 124
Björn Esser (besser82) 118
Pete Walter (pwalter) 81
Filipe Rosset (filiperosset) 71
Peter Smith (smithp) 40
Charles-Antoine Couret (renault) 20
Nie Lili (lnie) 19
Adam Williamson (adamwill) 18
Martti Kuosmanen (kuosmanen) 15
bojan 15
Daniel Lara Souza (danniel) 13
anonymous 12
Eugene Mah (imabug) 11
Lukas Brabec (lbrabec) 9
Luis Roca (roca) 9
mastaiza 9
Ankur Sinha (ankursinha) 7
Paul Whalen (pwhalen) 7
mzink 7
lruzicka 7
Hans Müller (cairo) 6
Luis Enrique Bazán De León (lbazan) 6
František Zatloukal (frantisekz) 6
Peter Robinson (pbrobinson) 6
Jared Smith (jsmith) 5
Wolfgang Ulbrich (raveit65) 4
Rory Gallagher (earthwalker) 4
sassam 4
Mirek Svoboda (goodmirek) 4
leigh123linux 4
Héctor H. Louzao P. (hhlp) 4
Stephen Gallagher (sgallagh) 4
Alessio Ciregia (alciregi) 4
Randy Barlow (bowlofeggs) 3
Major Hayden (mhayden) 3
jonathan haas (jonha) 3
Juan Orti (jorti) 3
Sumantro Mukherjee (sumantrom) 3
Dusty Mabe (dustymabe) 3
Colin J Thomson (g6avk) 3
Masami Ichikawa (masami) 3
Kay Sievers (kay) 3
…and also 75 other reporters who created less than 3 reports each, but 85 reports combined!

1 If a person provides multiple comments to a single update, it is considered as a single comment. Karma value is not taken into account.

Validation Testing

Test period: Fedora 28 Final (2018-04-17 – 2018-05-01)
Testers: 17
Reports: 305
Unique referenced bugs: 2

Name Reports submitted Referenced bugs1
pwhalen 92
frantisekz 27
kparal 27 1571786 (1)
sumantrom 20
pschindl 19
lnie 15
lbrabec 15
tenk 15 1562024 (1)
sinnykumari 15
alciregi 12
sgallagh 12
lruzicka 11
satellit 8
kevin 6
adamwill 5
wadadli 4
cmurf 2

1 This is a list of bug reports referenced in test results. The bug itself may not be created by the same person.

Bug Reports

Test period: Fedora 28 Final (2018-04-17 – 2018-05-01)
Reporters: 226
New reports: 388

Name Reports submitted1 Excess reports2 Accepted blockers3
ricky.tigg at gmail.com 17 3 (17%) 0
Florian Weimer 10 0 (0%) 0
Nerijus Baliūnas 9 0 (0%) 0
roel.lerma at gmail.com 9 0 (0%) 0
Adam Williamson 7 0 (0%) 0
David Dreggors 7 0 (0%) 0
Alessio 6 1 (16%) 0
Ankur Sinha (FranciscoD) 6 0 (0%) 0
Chris Murphy 6 0 (0%) 0
Hayden 6 0 (0%) 0
Juan Orti 6 1 (16%) 0
mastaiza 6 0 (0%) 0
Gwendal 5 1 (20%) 0
Kamil Páral 5 2 (40%) 0
Hedayat Vatankhah 4 0 (0%) 0
Kyriakos Fytrakis 4 0 (0%) 0
Paul Whalen 4 0 (0%) 0
Robbie Harwood 4 0 (0%) 0
Akira TAGOH 3 0 (0%) 0
Christian Heimes 3 0 (0%) 0
James Ettle 3 0 (0%) 0
Luis 3 0 (0%) 0
Lukas Ruzicka 3 0 (0%) 0
mithrial at gmail.com 3 0 (0%) 0
mvharlan 3 1 (33%) 0
Paul Montalvan 3 0 (0%) 0
Pavel Roskin 3 0 (0%) 0
PHolder+RedHatBugzilla at gmail.com 3 0 (0%) 0
Sam Varshavchik 3 0 (0%) 0
Severin Gehwolf 3 0 (0%) 0
Vladimir Benes 3 0 (0%) 0
…and also 195 other reporters who created less than 3 reports each, but 228 reports combined!

1 The total number of new reports (including “excess reports”). Reopened reports or reports with a changed version are not included, because it was not technically easy to retrieve those. This is one of the reasons why you shouldn’t take the numbers too seriously, but just as interesting and fun data.
2 Excess reports are those that were closed as NOTABUG, WONTFIX, WORKSFORME, CANTFIX or INSUFFICIENT_DATA. Excess reports are not necessarily a bad thing, but they make for interesting statistics. Close manual inspection is required to separate valuable excess reports from those which are less valuable.
3 This only includes reports that were created by that particular user and accepted as blockers afterwards. The user might have proposed other people’s reports as blockers, but this is not reflected in this number.

The post Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F28 Final appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

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Dusty Mabe: Pinning Deployments in OSTree Based Systems

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Introduction RPM-OSTree/OSTree conveniently allows you to rollback if you upgrade and don’t like the upgraded software. This is done by keeping around the old deployment; the old software you booted in to. After a single upgrade you’ll have a booted deployement and the rollback deployment. On the next upgrade the current rollback deployment will be discarded and the current booted deployment will become the new rollback deployment.
Typically these two deployments are all that is kept around.

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Daniel Pocock: OSCAL'18 Debian, Ham, SDR and GSoC activities

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Over the weekend I’ve been in Tirana, Albania for OSCAL 2018.

Crowdfunding report

The crowdfunding campaign to buy hardware for the radio demo was successful. The gross sum received was GBP 110.00, there were Paypal fees of GBP 6.48 and the net amount after currency conversion was EUR 118.29. Here is a complete list of transaction IDs for transparency so you can see that if you donated, your contribution was included in the total I have reported in this blog. Thank you to everybody who made this a success.

The funds were used to purchase an Ultracell UCG12-45 sealed lead-acid battery from Tashi in Tirana, here is the receipt. After OSCAL, the battery is being used at a joint meeting of the Prishtina hackerspace and SHRAK, the amateur radio club of Kosovo on 24 May. The battery will remain in the region to suport any members of the ham community who want to visit the hackerspaces and events.

Debian and Ham radio booth

Local volunteers from Albania and Kosovo helped run a Debian and ham radio/SDR booth on Saturday, 19 May.

The antenna was erected as a folded dipole with one end joined to the Tirana Pyramid and the other end attached to the marquee sheltering the booths. We operated on the twenty meter band using an RTL-SDR dongle and upconverter for reception and a Yaesu FT-857D for transmission. An MFJ-1708 RF Sense Switch was used for automatically switching between the SDR and transceiver on PTT and an MFJ-971 ATU for tuning the antenna.

I successfully made contact with 9A1D, a station in Croatia. Enkelena Haxhiu, one of our GSoC students, made contact with Z68AA in her own country, Kosovo.

Anybody hoping that Albania was a suitably remote place to hide from media coverage of the British royal wedding would have been disappointed as we tuned in to GR9RW from London and tried unsuccessfully to make contact with them. Communism and royalty mix like oil and water: if a deceased dictator was already feeling bruised about an antenna on his pyramid, he would probably enjoy water torture more than a radio transmission celebrating one of the world’s most successful hereditary monarchies.

A versatile venue and the dictator’s revenge

It isn’t hard to imagine communist dictator Enver Hoxha turning in his grave at the thought of his pyramid being used for an antenna for communication that would have attracted severe punishment under his totalitarian regime. Perhaps Hoxha had imagined the possibility that people may gather freely in the streets: as the sun moved overhead, the glass facade above the entrance to the pyramid reflected the sun under the shelter of the marquees, giving everybody a tan, a low-key version of a solar death ray from a sci-fi movie. Must remember to wear sunscreen for my next showdown with a dictator.

The security guard stationed at the pyramid for the day was kept busy chasing away children and more than a few adults who kept arriving to climb the pyramid and slide down the side.

Meeting with Debian’s Google Summer of Code students

Debian has three Google Summer of Code students in Kosovo this year. Two of them, Enkelena and Diellza, were able to attend OSCAL. Albania is one of the few countries they can visit easily and OSCAL deserves special commendation for the fact that it brings otherwise isolated citizens of Kosovo into contact with an increasingly large delegation of foreign visitors who come back year after year.

We had some brief discussions about how their projects are starting and things we can do together during my visit to Kosovo.

Workshops and talks

On Sunday, 20 May, I ran a workshop Introduction to Debian and a workshop on Free and open source accounting. At the end of the day Enkelena Haxhiu and I presented the final talk in the Pyramid, Death by a thousand chats, looking at how free software gives us a unique opportunity to disable a lot of unhealthy notifications by default.

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Fedora Community Blog: Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F28 Beta

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It’s time for some stats concerning Fedora 28 Beta!

Welcome back to another installation of Heroes of Fedora, where we’ll look at the stats concerning the testing of Fedora 28 Beta. The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. So, without further ado, let’s get started!

 

Updates Testing

Test period: Fedora 28 Beta (2018-03-06 – 2018-04-17)
Testers: 166
Comments1: 1467

Name Updates commented
Pete Walter (pwalter) 219
Dmitri Smirnov (cserpentis) 148
Filipe Rosset (filiperosset) 111
Martti Kuosmanen (kuosmanen) 90
Björn Esser (besser82) 88
Alexander Kurtakov (akurtakov) 76
Hans Müller (cairo) 71
Peter Smith (smithp) 70
Charles-Antoine Couret (renault) 55
sassam 54
Nie Lili (lnie) 41
Piotr Drąg (piotrdrag) 37
Daniel Lara Souza (danniel) 32
Adam Williamson (adamwill) 24
anonymous 22
lruzicka 15
Randy Barlow (bowlofeggs) 12
Eugene Mah (imabug) 12
Parag Nemade (pnemade) 10
Peter Robinson (pbrobinson) 9
František Zatloukal (frantisekz) 9
Matthias Runge (mrunge) 9
Paul Whalen (pwhalen) 8
Tom Sweeney (tomsweeneyredhat) 7
Alessio Ciregia (alciregi) 7
mastaiza 6
Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek (zbyszek) 5
bluepencil 5
Sérgio Monteiro Basto (sergiomb) 5
sobek 5
Héctor H. Louzao P. (hhlp) 5
zdenek 4
Itamar Reis Peixoto (itamarjp) 4
Neal Gompa (ngompa) 4
leigh123linux 4
Nathan (nathan95) 4
Wolfgang Ulbrich (raveit65) 3
Luis Roca (roca) 3
Rory Gallagher (earthwalker) 3
Jiri Eischmann (eischmann) 3
Dusty Mabe (dustymabe) 3
Miro Hrončok (churchyard) 3
Christian Kellner (gicmo) 3
Kevin Fenzi (kevin) 3
Colin Walters (walters) 3
…and also 121 other reporters who created less than 3 reports each, but 153 reports combined!

1 If a person provides multiple comments to a single update, it is considered as a single comment. Karma value is not taken into account.

Validation Testing

Test period: Fedora 28 Beta (2018-03-06 – 2018-04-17)
Testers: 23
Reports: 991
Unique referenced bugs: 35

Name Reports submitted Referenced bugs1
pwhalen 367 1520580 1553488 1565217 1566593 (4)
lruzicka 170 1558027 1566566 1569411 on bare metal (4)
alciregi 108 1520580 1536356 1541868 1552130 1553935 1554072 1554075 1556951 1557472 1561072 1564784 1568119 (12)
tablepc 56 1560314 (1)
lnie 51 1557655 1557659 (2)
coremodule 34
satellit 23 1519042 1533310 1554996 1558671 1561304 (5)
lbrabec 22
tenk 20 1539499 1561304 1562024 (3)
sumantrom 20
kparal 18 1555752 1557472 1560738 1562087 (4)
frantisekz 17 1561115 (1)
sgallagh 15
table1pc 15
adamwill 12 1560738 1561768 (2)
sinnykumari 10
fab 7
siddharthvipul1 6
pschindl 6
kevin 5
jdoss 4
mohanboddu 4
hobbes1069 1 1561284 (1)

1 This is a list of bug reports referenced in test results. The bug itself may not be created by the same person.

Bug Reports

Test period: Fedora 28 Beta (2018-03-06 – 2018-04-17)
Reporters: 320
New reports: 1918

Name Reports submitted1 Excess reports2 Accepted blockers3
Fedora Release Engineering 1104 47 (4%) 0
Lukas Ruzicka 31 6 (19%) 2
lnie 30 9 (30%) 0
Adam Williamson 25 0 (0%) 7
Alessio 22 8 (36%) 0
Chris Murphy 18 1 (5%) 0
Heiko Adams 16 2 (12%) 0
Florian Weimer 12 0 (0%) 0
mastaiza 12 0 (0%) 0
ricky.tigg at gmail.com 11 3 (27%) 0
Juan Orti 10 0 (0%) 0
Menanteau Guy 10 6 (60%) 0
Christian Heimes 9 1 (11%) 0
Daniel Mach 9 0 (0%) 0
Stephen Gallagher 8 0 (0%) 1
Hayden 8 0 (0%) 0
Jared Smith 8 1 (12%) 0
Joseph 8 0 (0%) 0
pmkellly at frontier.com 8 1 (12%) 0
René Genz 8 1 (12%) 0
Paul Whalen 7 0 (0%) 1
Anass Ahmed 7 0 (0%) 0
František Zatloukal 7 0 (0%) 0
Hedayat Vatankhah 7 0 (0%) 0
Leslie Satenstein 7 0 (0%) 0
Miro Hrončok 7 0 (0%) 0
Randy Barlow 7 0 (0%) 0
shirokuro005 at gmail.com 7 0 (0%) 0
Andrey Motoshkov 6 0 (0%) 0
Ankur Sinha (FranciscoD) 6 0 (0%) 0
J. Haas 6 0 (0%) 0
Jens Petersen 6 0 (0%) 0
John Reiser 6 0 (0%) 0
Langdon White 6 1 (16%) 0
Martin Pitt 6 0 (0%) 0
Merlin Mathesius 6 1 (16%) 0
Mikhail 6 0 (0%) 0
Stephen 6 0 (0%) 0
Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek 6 0 (0%) 0
Kamil Páral 5 1 (20%) 1
Ali Akcaagac 5 0 (0%) 0
Parag Nemade 5 0 (0%) 0
Peter Robinson 5 2 (40%) 0
sumantro 5 0 (0%) 0
Christian Kellner 4 0 (0%) 0
dac.override at gmail.com 4 0 (0%) 0
Dawid Zamirski 4 0 (0%) 0
Jiri Eischmann 4 0 (0%) 0
John Dennis 4 1 (25%) 0
Kalev Lember 4 0 (0%) 0
Milan Zink 4 0 (0%) 0
Miroslav Suchý 4 1 (25%) 0
Petr Pisar 4 0 (0%) 0
satellitgo at gmail.com 4 1 (25%) 0
sedrubal 4 0 (0%) 0
Steven Haigh 4 0 (0%) 0
Dusty Mabe 3 0 (0%) 1
Bhushan Barve 3 0 (0%) 0
Daniel Rindt 3 0 (0%) 0
deadrat 3 0 (0%) 0
Gwendal 3 0 (0%) 0
Henrique Montemor Junqueira 3 0 (0%) 0
Joachim Frieben 3 0 (0%) 0
luke_l at o2.pl 3 0 (0%) 0
Matías Zúñiga 3 0 (0%) 0
Michel Normand 3 0 (0%) 0
Mike FABIAN 3 0 (0%) 0
Mirek Svoboda 3 0 (0%) 0
Nathanael Noblet 3 1 (33%) 0
Quentin Tayssier 3 0 (0%) 0
sebby2k 3 0 (0%) 0
Vadim 3 0 (0%) 0
Vadim Raskhozhev 3 0 (0%) 0
Vladimir Benes 3 0 (0%) 0
Yaakov Selkowitz 3 0 (0%) 0
yucef sourani 3 0 (0%) 0
Zdenek Chmelar 3 1 (33%) 0
…and also 243 other reporters who created less than 3 reports each, but 293 reports combined!

1 The total number of new reports (including “excess reports”). Reopened reports or reports with a changed version are not included, because it was not technically easy to retrieve those. This is one of the reasons why you shouldn’t take the numbers too seriously, but just as interesting and fun data.
2 Excess reports are those that were closed as NOTABUG, WONTFIX, WORKSFORME, CANTFIX or INSUFFICIENT_DATA. Excess reports are not necessarily a bad thing, but they make for interesting statistics. Close manual inspection is required to separate valuable excess reports from those which are less valuable.
3 This only includes reports that were created by that particular user and accepted as blockers afterwards. The user might have proposed other people’s reports as blockers, but this is not reflected in this number.

 

The post Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F28 Beta appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

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Richard W.M. Jones: My talk from the RISC-V workshop in Barcelona

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Fedora Magazine: Audacity quick tip: quickly remove background noise

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When recording sounds on a laptop — say for a simple first screencast — many users typically use the built-in microphone. However, these small microphones also capture a lot of background noise. In this quick tip, learn how to use Audacity in Fedora to quickly remove the background noise from audio files.

Installing Audacity

Audacity is an application in Fedora for mixing, cutting, and editing audio files. It supports a wide range of formats out of the box on Fedora — including MP3 and OGG. Install Audacity from the Software application.

If the terminal is more your speed, use the command:

sudo dnf install audacity

Import your Audio, sample background noise

After installing Audacity, open the application, and import your sound using the File > Import menu item. This example uses a sound bite from freesound.org to which noise was added:

Next, take a sample of the background noise to be filtered out. With the tracks imported, select an area of the track that contains only the background noise. Then choose Effect >  Noise Reduction from the menu, and press the Get Noise Profile button.

Filter the Noise

Next, select the area of the track you want to filter the noise from. Do this either by selecting with the mouse, or Ctrl + a to select the entire track. Finally, open the Effect > Noise Reduction dialog again, and click OK to apply the filter.

Additionally, play around with the settings until your tracks sound better. Here is the original file again, followed by the noise reduced track for comparison (using the default settings):

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Audacity quick tip: quickly remove background noise

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When recording sounds on a laptop — say for a simple first screencast — many users typically use the built-in microphone. However, these small microphones also capture a lot of background noise. In this quick tip, learn how to use Audacity in Fedora to quickly remove the background noise from audio files.

Installing Audacity

Audacity is an application in Fedora for mixing, cutting, and editing audio files. It supports a wide range of formats out of the box on Fedora — including MP3 and OGG. Install Audacity from the Software application.

If the terminal is more your speed, use the command:

sudo dnf install audacity

Import your Audio, sample background noise

After installing Audacity, open the application, and import your sound using the File > Import menu item. This example uses a sound bite from freesound.org to which noise was added:


Next, take a sample of the background noise to be filtered out. With the tracks imported, select an area of the track that contains only the background noise. Then choose Effect >  Noise Reduction from the menu, and press the Get Noise Profile button.

Filter the Noise

Next, select the area of the track you want to filter the noise from. Do this either by selecting with the mouse, or Ctrl + a to select the entire track. Finally, open the Effect > Noise Reduction dialog again, and click OK to apply the filter.

Additionally, play around with the settings until your tracks sound better. Here is the original file again, followed by the noise reduced track for comparison (using the default settings):

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