Kushal Das: Aadhaar, the mass surveillance system

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If you are following me on Twitter, you have already seen a lot of (re)tweets
related to Aadhaar. For the people first time hearing this term, it is a 12
digit unique identification number provided by the Unique Identification
Authority of India (UIDAI). It is also the world’s largest bio-metric ID
system. It is supposed to be a voluntary service.

From the very beginning, this project tried to hide the details from the Indian
citizens. Let it be privacy advocates or security researchers or human rights
activists, everyone predicted that this will become a monster, a mass
surveillance system, a tool of choice of the power hungry dictators.

Like any other complex system, the majority of the people only see the
advertisements from the government and completely miss all the problems and
horror stories this project is creating. Here are a few links below for the
interested people to read.

Neither my wife, nor our daughter has an Aadhaar (I also don’t have one), that
means Py (our daughter) did not get admission to any school last year.

Whenever security researchers or journalists tried to report on the project,
the UIDAI tried to hide behind denials and police complaints against the
journalists or
researchers
.
There are various reports on how one can get access (both read/write) to the
actual production database with as little as $10-30. We now have examples of
terrorist organizations having
access
to the same
database. The UIDAI kept telling how this is an unhackable technology and for
security they have a 13 feet wall outside of the data
center

which in turn will keep all hackers away.

They have already build 360 degree
databases
on
top of Aadhaar, and now they are trying to link
DNA
to the same
system.

The current government of India tried their level best to argue in the Supreme
Court of India to tell that Indians don’t have any rights to privacy. But,
thankfully they failed in this effort, and the Supreme Court ruled privacy as
a fundamental
right
.
We are now waiting for the judgment on the Aadhaar (which will hopefully come
out in the next few weeks).

Meanwhile, the evil nexus is pushing down Aadhaar to the throats of the Indian
citizens and Pakistani spies and
gods
.

A few days ago, in an event in Jaipur, they asked Edward Snowden the
following question
.

How big of an issue is privacy?

The answer started with from where that argument comes from.

The answer is that Nazi Germany. The nazi minister of propaganda Joseph
Goebbels did this. Because he was trying to change the conversation away from
“What are your rights?” and “What evidences must the government show?” to
violet them, to intrude into your private life and instead said “Why do you
need your rights?”, “How can you justify your rights?”, “Isn’t strange that you
are invoking your rights? Isn’t that unusual?”. But, in a free society this is
the opposite of the way it is supposed to work. We don’t need to explain why
you have a right. You don’t need to explain why it is valuable, why you need
it. It is for the government to explain why you don’t deserve it. They go to a
court, they show that you are a criminal. This is increasingly falling out of
favor, because the governments and companies think that it is inefficient. It
is too much work. Life would be easier, life would be more convenient for them,
life would be more profitable for them if we didn’t have any rights at all.

But, privacy isn’t about something to hide, privacy is about something to
protect. And that is the very concept of liberty. It is the idea that there can
be some part of you, of your life, of your ideas that belong to you, not to
society. And you get to make the decision about who you share that with. — Edward Snowden

Why are we reading this in your blog?

This might a question for many of you. Why are reading this in a blog post or
in a planet? Because we, the people with the knowledge of technology are also
part of these evil plans. We now know about many private companies taking part
with their local government to build 360 degree profiles, to track the citizens
and to run the mass surveillance systems. For example, related to Aadhaar, for
the last 4 years, Google silently pushed the Aadhaar support phone number
(which now UIDAI is trying to stay away from) to every Google Android phone in
India. When they got caught red
handed
,
they claimed that they did it inadvertently. Finacle software by Infosys
denies creation of bank accounts without
Aadhaar
.
Microsoft is working to link Skype with
Aadhaar
. Bill Gates
is
trying

to push the idea that Aadhaar is all good, and does not have any issues.

What can you do?

You can start by educating yourself first. Read more about the technologies
which controls our lives. Have doubt about the things and try to understand how
they actually work. Write about them, ask questions to the people in power.
Talk about the issues to your friends and family.

This is not gong to be an easy task, but, we all should keep fighting back to
make sure of a better future for our next generation.

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José A. Reyes H.: FLOCK 2018 – Dresden Germany [Latam in Flock]

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Del 8 al 11 de agosto de 2018 asistí a FLOCK en Dresde, Alemania. Al evento asistieron expertos, profesionales, estudiantes de FEDORA y RED HAT (invitados especiales). Se llevó a cabo en el Radisson Blu Park Hotel, que permitió paseos (paseos en tren) en el hermoso centro antiguo. Flock es la conferencia anual centrada en…… Seguir leyendo FLOCK 2018 – Dresden Germany [Latam in Flock]

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Fedora Badges: New badge: DevConf.us Attendee 2018 !

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DevConf.us Attendee 2018You attended the 2018 iteration of DevConf.us, a yearly open source conference in the United States

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Daniel Berrange: ANNOUNCE: gtk-vnc 0.9.0 release

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I’m pleased to announce a new release of GTK-VNC, version 0.9.0. This is a cleanup/modernization release. Note that the next release (1.0.0) will drop support for GTK-2

  • Requires gnutls >= 3.1.18
  • Requires libgcrypt >= 1.5.0
  • Requires glib2 >= 2.42.0
  • Use libgcrypt for DES routines
  • Add missing cipher close calls in ARD auth
  • Check for errors after reading mslogon params
  • Support newer UltraVNC mslogon auth type code
  • Avoid divide by zero in mslogin auth from bogus params
  • Re-allow python2 accidentally blocked when removing python binding

Thanks to all those who reported bugs and provides patches that went into this new release.

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Remi Collet: PHP version 7.1.21 and 7.2.9

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RPM of PHP version 7.2.9 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 25-27 and Enterprise Linux  6 (RHEL, CentOS).

RPM of PHP version 7.1.21 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Fedora 25 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

emblem-notice-24.pngNo security fix this month, so no update for version 5.6.37 and 7.0.31.

emblem-important-2-24.pngPHP version 5.5 have reached its end of life and is no longer maintained by the PHP project.

These versions are also available as Software Collections in the remi-safe repository.

Version announcements:

emblem-notice-24.pngInstallation : use the Configuration Wizard and choose your version and installation mode.

Replacement of default PHP by version 7.2 installation (simplest):

yum-config-manager --enable remi-php72
yum update php*

Parallel installation of version 7.2 as Software Collection (x86_64 only):

yum install php72

Replacement of default PHP by version 7.1 installation (simplest):

yum-config-manager --enable remi-php71
yum update

Parallel installation of version 7.1 as Software Collection (x86_64 only):

yum install php71

And soon in the official updates:

emblem-important-2-24.pngTo be noticed :

  • EL7 rpm are build using RHEL-7.5
  • EL6 rpm are build using RHEL-6.10
  • a lot of new extensions are also available, see the PECL extension RPM status page

emblem-notice-24.pngInformation, read:

Base packages (php)

Software Collections (php56 / php70 / php71 / php72)

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Richard Hughes: NVMe Firmware: I Need Your Data

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In a recent Google Plus post I asked what kind of hardware was most interesting to be focusing on next. UEFI updating is now working well with a large number of vendors, and the LVFS “onboarding” process is well established now. On that topic we’ll hopefully have some more announcements soon. Anyway, back to the topic in hand: The overwhelming result from the poll was that people wanted NVMe hardware supported, so that you can trivially update the firmware of your SSD. Firmware updates for SSDs are important, as most either address data consistency issues or provide nice performance fixes.

Unfortunately there needs to be some plumbing put in place first, so don’t expect anything awesome very fast. The NVMe ecosystem is pretty new, and things like “what version number firmware am I running now” and “is this firmware OEM firmware or retail firmware” are still queried using vendor-specific extensions. I only have two devices to test with (Lenovo P50 and Dell XPS 13) and so I’m asking for some help with data collection. Primarily I’m trying to find out what NMVe hardware people are actually using, so I can approach the most popular vendors first (via the existing OEMs). I’m also going to be looking at the firmware revision string that each vendor sets to find quirks we need — for instance, Toshiba encodes MODEL VENDOR, and everyone else specifies VENDOR MODEL. Some drives contain the vendor data with a GUID, some don’t, I have no idea of the relative number or how many different formats there are. I’d also like to know how many firmware slots the average SSD has, and the percentage of drives that have a protected slot 1 firmware. This all lets us work out how safe it would be to attempt a new firmware update on specific hardware — the very last thing we want to do is brick an expensive new NMVe SSD with all your data on.

So, what do I would like you to do. You don’t need to reboot, unmount any filesystems or anything like that. Just:

  1. Install nvme (e.g. dnf install nvme-cli or build it from source
  2. Run the following command:
    sudo nvme id-ctrl --raw-binary /dev/nvme0 > /tmp/id-ctrl
    
  3. If that worked, run the following command:
    curl -F type=nvme 
        -F "machine_id="`cat /etc/machine-id` 
        -F file=@/tmp/id-ctrl 
        https://staging.fwupd.org/lvfs/upload_hwinfo

If you’re not sure if you have a NVMe drive you can check with the nvme command above. The command isn’t doing anything with the firmware; it’s just asking the NVMe drive to report what it knows about itself. It should be 100% safe, the kernel already did the same request at system startup.

We are sending your random machine ID to ensure we don’t record duplicate submissions — if that makes you unhappy for some reason just choose some other 32 byte hex string. In the binary file created by nvme there is the encoded model number and serial number of your drive; if this makes you uneasy please don’t send the file.

Many thanks, and needless to say I’ll be posting some stats here when I’ve got enough submissions to be statistically valid.

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Fedora Magazine: Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

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The Fedora Magazine recently interviewed Lennart Jern on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series  on the Fedora Magazine. This series profiles Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done. Contact us on the feedback form to express your interest in becoming a interviewee.

Who is Lennart Jern?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion.  “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Star Wars: The Force Awakens are his two favorite movies. Lennart likes simplicity. “I generally don’t like fancy food. Nothing beats a homemade pesto-mozzarella pizza.

Lennart Jern and his two dogs

Self hosting is one of Jern’s hobbies. He hosts a private blog and a git service running on a cluster of Raspberry Pi computers. “For my blog I am using Jeckll and the git service is gogs.” The Raspberry PI cluster makes use of Kubernetes. Lennart uses several other open source tools to maintain the hosted environment. “I use for the self hosting environment are certbot for certificates, ansible for automation and parallelization of tasks.”

The Fedora Community

Lennart became active with the Fedora Community when his friend introduced him to Fedora. “A friend of mine, Ludvig, was running Fedora on his laptop and I got curious. I wanted to know more about the differences between Linux distros so I simply tried it out.” His friend, Ludvig, also convinced him to get involved with the open source world. “He was using Fedora when we were in high school, probably because it was what Linus Torvalds was using at the time.”

Lennart’s first interactions with the Fedora Community came when he was looking for solutions to issues with Pulse Audio. He found the community friendly and welcoming. “It is nothing to be afraid of, just try it! You don’t have to commit all your free time to it, nobody expects that. If you stumble across something that you can fix or report, do it! It will feel great!

When asked what he would like people to know about Fedora Lennart was quick to mention stability. “I feel that many still have the impression of Fedora being a bleeding edge distro with problems and broken applications every new release. Bleeding edge might still be true, but I find Fedora very well polished and stable these days.” Lennart would also like to see Fedora more well know in Nordic countries.

What Hardware?

Jern has five machines running Fedora. One desktop, one laptop and three Raspberry Pi computers. The desktop is a custom computer with an AMD Ryzen 5 1600 CPU and 16 GB of ram. The desktop makes use of two graphics cards for multi seating. The video cards are both made by Asus. The first is a Radeon 6870 and the second is a Radeon RX 550. The laptop is a refurbished HP ProBook 430 G2. It is equipped with an Intel Core i5-4210U and 4 GB or ram. Two of the Rasberry Pi computers are model 3 B+ and the other is a model 3B.

What Software?

All of Lennart’s computers run Fedora 28. “The laptop and desktop are both on the Workstation edition while the raspberries have minimal installations.”

One of the raspberries (the model B) is still running ARMv7, while the other two are running the newer aarch64 images. Jern’s laptop and desktop are close to the base workstation edition. “I just add a couple of GNOME extensions specifically the Drop Down Terminal and the Dash to Dock extensions.” Notable applications that Lennart uses include:

  • Chrome as browser,
  • Atom as text editor/IDE,
  • Gedit or vim for ad hoc text editing,
  • Slack and Telegram for chatting.

Lennart also use git for version control, occasionally with gitg and meld as helping tools. He makes use of Gnome Boxes and vagrant for experimenting with things in virtual machines and docker for his container needs. “Finally, an important piece of software that I have come to rely on is pass and QtPass for password management.” Jern also uses syncthing for synchronizing files between my computers.

When I’m done geeking around, I relax with some Steam games. And, when I do not need the full power of my desktop I let it contribute to the World Community Grid.

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Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2018-33

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Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections or anything else.

Upcoming meetings

Schedule

  • Code testable deadline was August 14.
  • Code completion deadline is August 28.
  • The deadline for software string translations is August 28.

Changes

Incomplete changes have been reported to FESCo.

Deferred to Fedora 30

Status

The numbers below reflect the current state of Bugzilla tracking bugs.

NEW/ASSIGNED 7
MODIFIED 15
ON_QA 22
(total) 44

 

The post FPgM report: 2018-33 appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

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Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

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The Fedora Magazine recently interviewed Lennart Jern on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series  on the Fedora Magazine. This series profiles Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done. Contact us on the feedback form to express your interest in becoming a interviewee.

Who is Lennart Jern?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion.  “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Star Wars: The Force Awakens are his two favorite movies. Lennart likes simplicity. “I generally don’t like fancy food. Nothing beats a homemade pesto-mozzarella pizza.

Lennart Jern and his two dogs

Self hosting is one of Jern’s hobbies. He hosts a private blog and a git service running on a cluster of Raspberry Pi computers. “For my blog I am using Jeckll and the git service is gogs.” The Raspberry PI cluster makes use of Kubernetes. Lennart uses several other open source tools to maintain the hosted environment. “I use for the self hosting environment are certbot for certificates, ansible for automation and parallelization of tasks.”

The Fedora Community

Lennart became active with the Fedora Community when his friend introduced him to Fedora. “A friend of mine, Ludvig, was running Fedora on his laptop and I got curious. I wanted to know more about the differences between Linux distros so I simply tried it out.” His friend, Ludvig, also convinced him to get involved with the open source world. “He was using Fedora when we were in high school, probably because it was what Linus Torvalds was using at the time.”

Lennart’s first interactions with the Fedora Community came when he was looking for solutions to issues with Pulse Audio. He found the community friendly and welcoming. “It is nothing to be afraid of, just try it! You don’t have to commit all your free time to it, nobody expects that. If you stumble across something that you can fix or report, do it! It will feel great!

When asked what he would like people to know about Fedora Lennart was quick to mention stability. “I feel that many still have the impression of Fedora being a bleeding edge distro with problems and broken applications every new release. Bleeding edge might still be true, but I find Fedora very well polished and stable these days.” Lennart would also like to see Fedora more well know in Nordic countries.

What Hardware?

Jern has five machines running Fedora. One desktop, one laptop and three Raspberry Pi computers. The desktop is a custom computer with an AMD Ryzen 5 1600 CPU and 16 GB of ram. The desktop makes use of two graphics cards for multi seating. The video cards are both made by Asus. The first is a Radeon 6870 and the second is a Radeon RX 550. The laptop is a refurbished HP ProBook 430 G2. It is equipped with an Intel Core i5-4210U and 4 GB or ram. Two of the Rasberry Pi computers are model 3 B+ and the other is a model 3B.

What Software?

All of Lennart’s computers run Fedora 28. “The laptop and desktop are both on the Workstation edition while the raspberries have minimal installations.”

One of the raspberries (the model B) is still running ARMv7, while the other two are running the newer aarch64 images. Jern’s laptop and desktop are close to the base workstation edition. “I just add a couple of GNOME extensions specifically the Drop Down Terminal and the Dash to Dock extensions.” Notable applications that Lennart uses include:

  • Chrome as browser,
  • Atom as text editor/IDE,
  • Gedit or vim for ad hoc text editing,
  • Slack and Telegram for chatting.

Lennart also use git for version control, occasionally with gitg and meld as helping tools. He makes use of Gnome Boxes and vagrant for experimenting with things in virtual machines and docker for his container needs. “Finally, an important piece of software that I have come to rely on is pass and QtPass for password management.” Jern also uses syncthing for synchronizing files between my computers.

When I’m done geeking around, I relax with some Steam games. And, when I do not need the full power of my desktop I let it contribute to the World Community Grid.

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Fedora Infrastructure Status: Major service disruption

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New status major: vpn issues for services: Ipsilon, Badges, Blockerbugs, Package Updates Manager, Fedora Infrastructure Cloud, COPR Build System, Documentation website, Fedora elections, Account System, Fedora Messaging Bus, Fedora Calendar, Fedora pastebin service, The Koji Buildsystem, Koschei Continuous Integration, Kerberos, Mailing Lists, Mirror List, Mirror Manager, Fedora Packages App, Pagure, Fedora People, Package Database, Package maintainers git repositories, Fedora Container Registry, Tagger, Fedora websites, Fedora Wiki, Zodbot IRC bot

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