HULK Rijeka: Obilježavanje Dana slobode dokumenata 27. ožujka 2019. u Rijeci

Share Button

Obilježavanje Dana slobode dokumenata u srijedu, 27. ožujka 2019. godine u Rijeci održat će se u zgradi Sveučilišnih Odjela Sveučilišta u Rijeci, Radmile Matejčić 2, u prostoriji O-028, s početkom u 16 sati.

Program obilježavanja Dana slobode dokumenata u Rijeci je sljedeći:

  • 16:00 — 16:30 Zašto slavimo Dan slobode dokumenata: OpenOffice.org, LibreOffice i OpenDocument (Vedran Miletić)
  • 16:35 — 16:55 reStructuredText: običan tekst, samo strukturiran (Mia Doričić)
  • 17:00 — 17:15 Alat za upravljanje referencama na literaturu Zotero (Patrik Nikolić)

Nakon programa imat ćemo vremena za diskusiju i prigodno čašćenje po uzoru na našu proslavu izlaska LibreOfficea 3.3.

LibreOffice 3.3. cake
Mi u HULK-u smo slavili izlaske LibreOfficea prije nego je to postalo kul.

Nadamo se vašem dolasku!

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Allan Day: Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest

Share Button

This week I participated in the Parental Controls and Metered Data Hackfest, which was held at Red Hat’s London office.

Parental controls and metered data already exist in Endless and/or elementary OS in some shape or form. The goal of the hackfest was to plan how to upstream the features to GNOME. It’s great to see this kind of activity from downstreams so I was very happy to contribute in my capacity as an upstream UX designer.

There have been a fair few blog posts about the event already, so I’m going to try and avoid repeating what’s already been written…

Parental controls

Parental controls sound like a niche feature, but they actually have wider applicability than limiting what the kids can do with your laptop. This is because the same features that are used by parental controls can be useful for other types of functionality, particularly around “digital well-being”. For example, a parent might want to limit how much time their child spends using the computer, but someone might want to self-impose this same limit on themselves, in order to try and lead a healthier lifestyle.

Furthermore, outside of parental controls, the same functionality can be pitched in different ways. A feature like limiting the use of particular apps to certain times of the day could either be presented as a “digital well-being” feature, where the goal is to be happier and healthier, or as a “productivity” feature, where the goal is to help someone get more out of their time in front of the screen.

There are some interesting user experience questions that need to be answered here, such as to what extent we should focus on particular use cases, as well as what those use cases should be.

We discussed these questions a bit during the hackfest, but more thought is going to be necessary. The other next step will be to figure out what the initial MVP should be for these features, since they could potentially be quite extensive.

Metered data

Metered network connections are those that either have usage limits attached to them, or those which have financial costs for usage. In both cases this requires that we limit automatic/background network usage, as well as potentially showing warnings if the user is doing something that could result in high data usage.

My main interest in this area is to ensure that GNOME behaves correctly when people use mobile broadband, either by tethering their phone or when using a dedicated mobile broadband connection. (There’s nothing more frustrating than your laptop silently chewing through your data plan.)

The first target for this work is to make sure that automatic software updates behave well, but there’s some other interesting work that could come out of it, particularly around controls for whether unfocused or backgrounded apps are allowed to use the network.

Philip Withnall has created a survey to find out about peoples’ experiences using metered data. Please fill it out if you haven’t already!

Credits

The hackfest was a great event, and I’d like to thank the following people and organisations for making it possible:

  • Philip Withnall for organising the event
  • The GNOME Foundation for sponsoring me to attend
  • Red Hat for providing the venue

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-12

Share Button

Fedora Program Manager weekly report on Fedora Project development and progress

Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

Fedora 30 Beta is No-Go. Another Go/No-Go meeting will be held on Thursday. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week.

Announcements

Meetings and test days

Fedora 30 Status

Fedora 30 Beta was declared No-Go. The target release date moves to 2019-04-02.

Blocker bugs

Bug ID Blocker status Component Bug Status
1690566 Accepted spins-kickstarts POST

Changes

An updated list of incomplete changes is available in Bugzilla.

The Firefox Wayland By Default On Gnome change is postponed to Fedora 31.

FESCo will vote on including the Mono 5 change in Fedora 30 as well as Fedora 31.

Fedora 31 Status

Changes

Announced

Submitted to FESCo

Approved by FESCo

The post FPgM report: 2019-12 appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Fedora Community Blog: FAS username search in Fedora Happiness Packets

Share Button

Fedora Happiness Packets - project update

I have been recently working on incorporation of Fedora Accounts System’s username search functionality in the project “Fedora Happiness Packets”. After weeks of working, it’s so overwhelming to see its on the verge of completion and being incorporated in the project.

About the project

The search functionality is used to find the name and email address of Fedora Accounts System’s users from their username, making it a lot easier for any sender to send happiness packets to a particular user with the knowledge of just their username.

Getting started with python-fedora API

For incorporating the search, python-fedora API is used to retrieve the data. After authenticating as a genuine fas-user by passing credentials to AccountSystem, we can retrieve the data using the method person_by_username of a fas2 object.

Problems encountered

The solution to the problem statement was simple. What made the process challenging was lack of proper documentation of the Python-Fedora module. Since credentials like FAS username and FAS password were required for authenticating the user, the main goal was to use the data while the user logs into Fedora Happiness Packets.

I was aiming to use OpenID Connect, the client id, client secret which is used while registering the application to the OpenID provider (Ipsilon in this case). But the fas-client we have in python-fedora does not support OpenID Connect Authentication. This was the major problem which created a major stuck in the proceeding.

Another setback was Django’s crispy forms. Since we are using Crispy forms to create models and render the layout in the front end, it was difficult for me to access individual form elements since the whole concept was very new to me.

Quick fix

After getting solution recommendation from other admins of Fedora, I finally got a solution to pass through. Since the search functionality requires only an authenticated user, which necessarily may not be the user who logs in, we can use a testing Username and testing Password in the case of development environment. For testing, we can make a json file from where the original credentials and the values are read into the project.

What I learnt?

I worked in Django for the very first time and it was such an overwhelming experience. I got to learn most of the concepts of Django. How it works, how the data flows, how data gets rendered in the front end, etc. The concept of Django’s Crispy forms was something really new to me and I learnt how to deal with the it. Every time, I rely on documentation to get into details, but for the first time I was successfully able to get what is actually happening by going through the code manually.

My experience

I had really enjoyed working with such an welcoming community. Almost all of my doubts are cleared during this application process. What actually I learnt that I am gonna keep with myself forever is, “There is always an alternative solution to any problem! We just need to minimize the gap between its actual existence and our knowledge of its being”.

Vote of Thanks!

Thanks to Justin (@jflory7) for helping me with my piles of doubts and queries. Jona (@jonatoni) was very kind to find explicit time to frame my ideas, thanks to her. A special thanks to Clement (@cverna) for helping me proceed with a viable solution, during one of the major hurdle I faced.

Thank you 🙂

The post FAS username search in Fedora Happiness Packets appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Fabian Affolter: Fedora Security Lab

Share Button

The Fedora Security Lab was released as part of the Fedora 30 Candidate Beta cycle.

Grab it, test it and report back.

This time we don’t want to miss the release because of some last minute changes.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

How to set up Fedora Silverblue as a gaming station

Share Button

This article gives you a step by step guide to turn your Fedora Silverblue into an awesome gaming station with the help of Flatpak and Steam.

Note: Do you need the NVIDIA proprietary driver on Fedora 29 Silverblue for a complete experience? Check out this blog post for pointers.

Add the Flathub repository

This process starts with a clean Fedora 29 Silverblue installation with a user already created for you.

First, go to https://flathub.org/home and enable the Flathub repository on your system. To do this, click the Quick setup button on the main page.

Quick setup button on flathub.org/home

This redirects you to https://flatpak.org/setup/ where you should click on the Fedora icon.

Fedora icon on flatpak.org/setup

Now you just need to click on Flathub repository file. Open the downloaded file with the Software Install application.

Flathub repository file button on flatpak.org/setup/Fedora

The GNOME Software application opens. Next, click on the Install button. This action needs sudo permissions, because it installs the Flathub repository for use by the whole system.

Install button in GNOME Software

Install the Steam flatpak

You can now search for the Steam flatpak in GNOME Software. If you can’t find it, try rebooting — or logout and login — in case GNOME Software didn’t read the metadata. That happens automatically when you next login.

Searching for Steam

Click on the Steam row and the Steam page opens in GNOME Software. Next, click on Install.

Steam page in GNOME Software

And now you have installed Steam flatpak on your system.

Enable Steam Play in Steam

Now that you have Steam installed, launch it and log in. To play Windows games too, you need to enable Steam Play in Steam. To enable it, choose Steam > Settings from the menu in the main window.

Settings button in Steam

Navigate to the Steam Play section. You should see the option Enable Steam Play for supported titles is already ticked, but it’s recommended you also tick the Enable Steam Play option for all other titles. There are plenty of games that are actually playable, but not whitelisted yet on Steam. To see which games are playable, visit ProtonDB and search for your favorite game. Or just look for the games with the most platinum reports.

Steam Play settings menu on Steam

If you want to know more about Steam Play, you can read the article about it here on Fedora Magazine:

Appendix

You’re now ready to play plenty of games on Linux. Please remember to share your experience with others using the Contribute button on ProtonDB and report bugs you find on GitHub, because sharing is nice. 🙂


Photo by Hardik Sharma on Unsplash.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

mythcat: Fedora 29 : Testing the dnf python module.

Share Button


Today we tested with Fedora 29 a python module called DNF.
All users have used this tool.
This python module is not very documented on the internet.
A more complex example can be found on DNF tool documentation.
I tried to see what I can get from this module.
Let’s start installing it with the pip tool:

$ pip install dnf --user

Here are some tests that I managed to run in the python shell.

[mythcat@desk ~]$ python
Python 2.7.15 (default, Oct 15 2018, 15:26:09)
[GCC 8.2.1 20180801 (Red Hat 8.2.1-2)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import sys
>>> import dnf
>>> dir(dnf)
['Base', 'Plugin', 'VERSION', '__builtins__', '__doc__', '__file__', '__name__', '__package__',
'__path__', '__version__', 'base', 'callback', 'cli', 'comps', 'conf', 'const', 'crypto', 'db',
'dnf', 'dnssec', 'drpm', 'exceptions', 'goal', 'history', 'i18n', 'lock', 'logging', 'match_counter',
'module', 'package', 'persistor', 'plugin', 'pycomp', 'query', 'repo', 'repodict', 'rpm', 'sack',
'selector', 'subject', 'transaction', 'unicode_literals', 'util', 'warnings', 'yum']
>>> import dnf.conf
>>> print(dnf.conf.Conf())
[main]
assumeno: 0
assumeyes: 0
autocheck_running_kernel: 1
bandwidth: 0
best: 0
...
>>> import dnf.module
>>> import dnf.rpm
>>> import dnf.cli
>>> base = dnf.Base()
>>> base.update_cache()
True

This read all repositories:


>>> base.read_all_repos()

You need to read the sack for querying:


>>> base.fill_sack()

>>> base.sack_activation = True

Create a query to matches all packages in sack:


>>> qr=base.sack.query()

Get only available packages:


>>> qa=qr.available()

Get only installed packages:


>>> qi=qr.installed()
>>> q_a=qa.run()
>>> for pkg in qi.run():
... if pkg not in q_a:
... print('%s.%s' % (pkg.name, pkg.arch))
...
NetworkManager-openvpn.x86_64
NetworkManager-openvpn-gnome.x86_64
coolkey.x86_64
glibc-debuginfo.x86_64
glibc-debuginfo-common.x86_64
kernel.x86_64
kernel.x86_64
kernel-core.x86_64
kernel-core.x86_64

Get all packages installed on Linux:


>>> q_i=qi.run()
>>> for pkg in qi.run():
... print('%s.%s' % (pkg.name, pkg.arch))

You can see more about the Python programming language on my blog.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Remi Collet: PHP version 7.2.17RC1 and 7.3.4RC1

Share Button

Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

RPM of PHP version 7.3.4RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 27-29 and Enterprise Linux.

RPM of PHP version 7.2.16RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Fedora 27 and Enterprise Linux.

 

emblem-notice-24.pngPHP version 7.1 is now in security mode only, so no more RC will be released.

emblem-notice-24.pngInstallation : read the Repository configuration and choose your version.

Parallel installation of version 7.3 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php73

Parallel installation of version 7.2 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php72

Update of system version 7.3:

yum --enablerepo=remi-php73,remi-php73-test update php*

Update of system version 7.2:

yum --enablerepo=remi-php72,remi-php72-test update php*

Notice: version 7.3.4RC1 in Fedora rawhide for QA.

emblem-notice-24.pngEL-7 packages are built using RHEL-7.6.

emblem-notice-24.pngRC version is usually the same as the final version (no change accepted after RC, exception for security fix).

Software Collections (php72, php73)

Base packages (php)

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Remi Collet: Small history about QA

Share Button

Despite I’m mainly a developer, I now use most of my time on doing QA on PHP projects.

Here is, around release of versions7.2.17RC1 and 7.3.4RC1 a report which should help to understand this activity.

 

1. Presentation

Usually, tests are done by PHP developers, particularly thanks to travis and then by users who will install the RC version available 2 weeks before a GA version.

The PHP project follow a release process (cf README.RELEASE_PROCESS) which gives 2 days between the preparation of a version, the Tuesday on git, and the Thursday its announcement in the mailing lists. These 2 days are especially designed to allow the build of binary packages (mostly by Microsoft and often by me for my repository) and to allow a last QA check which mays allow to discover some late issue.

When the new versions were available (on Tuesday afternoon) I start building the packages for my repostiory, givinf more coverage than the current travis configuration:

  • Fedora 27 to 31
  • RHEL 6, 7 and 8-Beta
  • i386 and x86_64
  • NTS and ZTS
  • various compiler versions  (GCC 4 to 9) and system library versions

I also run the build of the 7.3.4RC1 package in Fedora rawhide to trigger the re-build of all the PHP stack in Koschei, one of the CI tools of the Fedora project.

Notice : time to build all the packages for all the targets is about 3h for each version !  (I really need a faster builder).

 

2. Discoverd issues

2.1. Failed tests with pcre2 version 10.33RC1

Already available in rawhide, this version introduce a change in some error message, making 2 tests to fail.

Minor issue, fixed in PHP 7.3+: commit c421d9a.

2.2. Failed tests on 32-bit

In fix of bug #76117 the output of var_export have changed, make 2 tests to fail on 32-bit.

After confirmation by the autor of the change, tests have been fixed in PHP 7.2+ : commits a467a89 and 5c8d69b.

2.3. Regression

Koschei allow to discover very quickly a important regression in the run of the “make test” command. After digging, this regression was introduced in the fix of bug #77609, read the comments on the commit 3ead672.

After discussion between the Release managers, it have been choosen to:

  • revert this change to get back to a sane situation
  • to re-run the release process (new tag onr git)

The version which wil be announced shortly will not be affected byt this regression.

 

3. Conclusion

To ensure of the quality of PHP, of no regression is a complex, long and serious work. Thanks to all the actors, developers, QA team and users, this works pretty well.

So, if you use PHP in a development environment, it is essential to install the RC versions to detect and report us quickly any problem, so we can react before the finale version.

For users of my repository, the RC versions are nearly always available in the testing repositories.

 

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button

Daniel Pocock: Don't trust me. Trust the voters.

Share Button

On 9 March, when I was the only member of the Debian community to submit a nomination and fully-fledged platform four minutes before the deadline, I did so on the full understanding that voters have the option to vote “None of the above”.

In other words, knowing that nobody can win by default, voters could reject and humiliate me.

Or worse.

My platform had been considered carefully over many weeks, despite a couple of typos. If Debian can’t accept that, maybe I should write typos for the White House press office?

One former leader of the project, Steve McIntyre, replied:

I don’t know what you think you’re trying to achieve here

Hadn’t I explained what I was trying to achieve in my platform? Instead of pressing the “send put down” button, why not try reading it?

Any reply in support of my nomination has been censored, so certain bullies create the impression that theirs is the last word.

I’ve put myself up for election before yet I’ve never, ever been so disappointed. Just as Venezuela’s crisis is now seen as a risk to all their neighbours, the credibility of elections and membership status is a risk to confidence throughout the world of free software. It has already happened in Linux Foundation and FSFE and now we see it happening in Debian.

In student politics, I was on the committee that managed a multi-million dollar budget for services in the union building and worked my way up to become NUS ambassador to Critical Mass, paid to cycle home for a year and sharing an office with one of the grand masters of postal voting: Voters: 0, Cabals: 1.

Ironically, the latter role is probably more relevant to the skills required to lead a distributed organization like Debian. Critical Mass rides have no leader at all.

When I volunteered to be FSFE Fellowship representative, I faced six other candidates. On the first day of voting, I was rear-ended by a small van, pushed several meters along the road and thrown off a motorbike, half way across a roundabout. I narrowly missed being run over by a bus.

It didn’t stop me. An accident? Russians developing new tactics for election meddling? Premonition of all the backstabbings to come? Miraculously, the Fellowship still voted for me to represent them.

Nonetheless, Matthias Kirschner, FSFE President, appointed one of the rival candidates to a superior class of membership just a few months later. He also gave full membership rights to all of his staff, ensuring they could vote in the meeting to remove elections from the constitution. Voters: 0, Cabals: 2.

My platform and photo for the FSFE election also emphasizes my role in Debian and some Debian people have always resented that, hence their pathological obsession with trying to control me or discredit me.

Yet in Debian’s elections, I’ve hit a dead-end. The outgoing leader of the project derided me for being something less than a “serious” candidate, despite the fact I was the only one who submitted a nomination before the deadline. People notice things like that. It doesn’t stick to me, it sticks to Debian.

I thank Chris Lamb for interjecting, because it reveals a lot about today’s problems. A series of snipes like that, usually made in private, have precipitated increasing hostility in recent times.

When I saw Lamb’s comment, I couldn’t help erupting in a fit of laughter. The Government of Lamb’s own country, the UK, was elected under the slogan Strong and stable leadership. There used to be a time when the sun never set on the British empire, today the sun never sets on laughter about their lack of a serious plan for Brexit. Serious leadership appears somehwat hard to find. Investigations found that the Pro-Brexit movement cheated with help from Cambridge Analytica and violations of campaign spending limits but the vote won’t be re-run (yet). Voters: 0, Cabals: 3.

It is disappointing when a leader seeks to vet his replacement in this way. In Venezuela, Hugo Chavez assured everybody that Nicolas Maduro was the only serious candidate who could succeed him. Venezuelans can see the consequences of such interventions by outgoing leaders clearly, but only during daylight, because the power has been out continuously for more than a week now. Many of their best engineers emigrated and Debian risks similar phenomena with these childish antics.

The whole point of a free and fair election is that voters are the ultimate decision maker and we all put our trust in the voters alone to decide who is the most serious candidate. I remain disappointed that Lamb was not willing to talk face-to-face with those people he had differences with.

In any other context, the re-opening of nominations and the repeated character attacks, facilitated by no less than another candidate who already holds office in the Debian account managers team would be considered as despicable as plagiarism and doping. So why is this acceptable in Debian? Voters: 0, Cabals: 4. If you ran a foot race this way, nobody would respect the outcome.

Having finished multiple cross countries, steeplechases and the odd marathon, why can’t I even start in Debian’s annual election?

In his interview with Mr Sam Varghese of IT Wire, rival candidate Joerg “Ganeff” Jaspert talks about “mutual trust”. Well, he doesn’t have to. I put my trust in the voters. That’s democracy. Who is afraid of it? That’s what a serious vote is all about.

Jaspert’s team have gone to further lengths to gain advantages, spreading rumours on the debian-private mailing list that they have “secret evidence” to justify their behaviour. It is amusing to see such ridiculous claims being made in Debian at the same time that Maduro in Venezuela is claiming to have secret evidence that his rival, Guaido, sabotaged the electricity grid. The golden rule of secret evidence: don’t hold your breath waiting for it to materialize.

While Maduro’s claims of sabotage seem far-fetched, it is widely believed that Republican-friendly Enron played a significant role in Californian power shortages, swinging public mood against the Democrat incumbent and catapulting the world’s first Governator into power (excuse the pun). Voters: 0, Cabals: 5.

If the DAMs do have secret evidence against any Debian Developer, it is only fair to show the evidence to the Developer and give that person a right of reply. If such “evidence” is spread behind somebody’s back, it is because it wouldn’t stand up to any serious scrutiny.

Over the last six months, Jaspert, Lamb and Co can’t even decide whether they’ve demoted or expelled certain people. That’s not leadership. It’s a disgrace. If people are trusted to choose me as the Debian Project Leader, I guarantee that no other volunteer will be put through such intimidation and shaming ever again.

After writing a blog about human rights in January, it is Jaspert who censored it from Planet Debian just hours later:

Many people were mystified. Why would my blog post about human rights be censored by Debian? People have been scratching their heads trying to work out how it could even remotely violate the code of conduct. Is it because the opening quote came from Jaspert himself and he didn’t want his cavalier attitude put under public scrutiny?

This is not involving anything from the universal declaration of human rights. We are simply a project of volunteers which is free to chose its members as it wishes.

which is a convenient way of eliminating competitors. After trampling on my blog and my nomination for the DPL election, it is simply a coincidence that Jaspert was the next to put his hand up and nominate.

In Jonathan Carter’s blog about his candidacy, he quotes Ian Murdock:

You don’t want design by committee, but you want to tap in to the wisdom of the crowd…. the crowd is the most intelligent of all.

If that is true, why is a committee of just three people, one of whom is a candidate, telling the crowd who they can and can’t vote for?

If that isn’t a gerrymander, what is?

Following through on the threat

If you are going to use veiled threats to keep your developers in line, every now and then, you have to follow through, as Jaspert has done recently using his DAM position to make defamatory statements in the press.

If Jaspert’s organization really is willing to threaten and shame volunteers and denounce human rights, as he did in this quote, then I wouldn’t want to be a part of it anyway, consider this my retirement and resignation and eliminate any further questions about my status. Nonetheless, I remain an independent Debian Developer just as committed to serving Debian users as ever before. Voters: 0, Cabals: 6.

I remain ready and willing to face “None of the above” and any other candidate, serious or otherwise, on a level playing field, to serve those who would vote for me over and above those who seek to blackmail me and push me around with secret evidence and veiled threats.

Powered by WPeMatico

Share Button