Installing Ring in Fedora 26

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Many communication platforms promise to link people together by video, voice, and data. But almost none of them promise or respect user privacy and freedom to a useful extent.

Ring is a universal communication system for any platform. But it is also a fully distributed system that protects users’ confidentiality. One protective feature is that it doesn’t store users personal data in a centralized location. Instead, it decentralizes this data through a combination of OpenDHT and Ethereum blockchain technology. In addition to being distributed, it has other unique features for communication:

  • Cross platform (works on Linux, Windows, MacOS, and Android)
  • Uses only free and open source software
  • Uses standard security protocols and end-to-end encryption
  • Works with desktop applications (like GNOME Contacts)

In July the Savoir-faire Linux team released the stable 1.0 version of Ring. Although it isn’t included in Fedora due to some of its requirements, the Savoir-faire team graciously provides a package for the Fedora community.

How to install Ring

To install, open a terminal and run the following commands:

sudo dnf config-manager --add-repo https://dl.ring.cx/ring-nightly/fedora_26/ring-nightly.repo
sudo dnf install ring

If you’re using an older version of Fedora, or an entirely different platform, check out the download page.

How to setup a RingID

Now that it’s installed, you’re ready to create an account (or link pre-existing one). The RingID allows other users to locate and contact you while still protecting your privacy. To create one:

  1. First, click on Create Ring Account.
  2. Next, add the required information.
  3. Finally, click Next.

Ring welcome screen
Ring register user name
RingID

The tutorial page offers more information on setting up this useful app. For example, you can learn how to secure your account and add devices which all notify you on a call. To learn more, check out the tutorial page.

 

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Frank Ch. Eigler: my solution to zeno's paradox

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You’ve probably heard of Zeno’s Paradox – the famous one about Achilles and the tortoise. It’s a 2000+ year old puzzle about the nature of infinity. An equivalent formulation is roughly this:

  • Imagine someone running from point A to Z. At some time t, the person will be half way between A and Z, let’s call it B.
  • The person will run from point B to Z. After time t/2, the person will be half way between B and Z, let’s call it C.
  • The person will run from point C to Z. After time t/4, the person will be half way between C and Z, let’s call it D.
  • One can continue this pattern of subdivision infinitely.
  • Therefore, the person will never reach Z.

It’s hard to believe that this little puzzle was taken too seriously by those clever Greeks. Formally modeling it in math is easy – arithmetic of infinite convergent series is taught in high schools, so it’s clear that at time 2t, the runner will reach Z. But the infinity is bothersome enough that even 2000 years later we take the problem seriously. Some even bring up silly stuff like quantum mechanics and uncertainty principles to try to work around it.

But I came across another way to approach the problem – to sever the Gordian Knot, so to speak. That is to recognize an implication of the basic fact that argumentation about a situation is not the same thing as the situation itself.

In this case, the argumentation can indeed go on infinitely, as one talks about shorter and shorter distances & time intervals. But the error in logic is the last step of the list above. The “therefore” doesn’t hold, because the only thing that’s infinite is all this argumentation. The situation is quite simple and evolves independently of how a goofy observer might want to talk about it – or to imagine breaking it up.

In other words, just because someone chooses a degenerate, infinite, useless way to talk about a situation, the situation itself can be perfectly finite, reasonable, intuitive. There is no paradox.

In other words, the map (argumentation) is not the same thing as the territory (subject of the argument).

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Petr Kovar: GUADEC 2017 Notes

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With GUADEC 2017 and the unconference days over, I wanted to share a few conference and post-conference notes with a broader audience.

First of all, as others have reported, at this year’s GUADEC, it was great to see an actual increase in numbers of attendees compared to previous years. This shows us that 20 years later, the community as a whole is still healthy and doing well.

At the conference venue.

While the Manchester weather was quite challenging, the conference was well-organized and I believe we all had a lot of fun both at the conference venue and at social events, especially at the awesome GNOME 20th Birthday Party. Kudos to all who made this happen!

At the GNOME 20th Birthday Party.

As I reported at the GNOME Foundation AGM, the docs team has been slightly more quiet recently than in the past and we would like to reverse this trend going forward.

At the GNOME 20th Birthday Party.
  • We held a shared docs and translation session for newcomers and regulars alike on the first two days of the post-GUADEC unconference. I was happy to see new faces showing up as well as having a chance to work a bit with long-time contributors. Special thanks goes to Kat for managing the docs-feedback mailing list queue, and Andre for a much needed docs bug triage.

    Busy working on docs and translations at the unconference venue.

  • Shaun worked on a new publishing system for help.gnome.org that could replace the current library-web scripts requiring release tarballs to get the content updated. The new platform would be a Pintail-based website with (almost) live content updates.
  • Localization-wise, there was some discussion around language packs, L10n data installation and initial-setup, spearheaded by Jens Petersen. While in gnome-getting-started-docs, we continue to replace size-heavy tutorial video files with lightweight SVG files, there is still a lot of other locale data left that we should aim to install on the user’s machine automatically when we know the user’s locale preference, though this is not quite what the user’s experience looks like nowadays. Support for that is something that I believe will require more input from PackageKit folks as well as from downstream installer developers.
  • The docs team also announced a change of leadership, with Kat passing the team leadership to me at GUADEC.
  • In other news, I announced a docs string freeze pilot that we plan to run post-GNOME 3.26.0 to allow translators more time to complete user docs translations. Details were posted to the gnome-doc-list and gnome-i18n mailing list. Depending on the community feedback we receive, we may run the program again in the next development cycle.
  • The docs team also had to cancel the planned Open Help Conference Docs Sprint due to most core members being unavailable around that time. We’ll try to find a better time for a docs team meetup some time later this year or early 2018. Let me know if you want to attend, the docs sprints are open to everybody interested in GNOME documentation, upstream or downstream.
At the closing session.

Last but not least, I’d like to say thank you to the GNOME Foundation and the Travel Committee for their continuous support, for sponsoring me again this year.

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Remi Collet: PHP version 7.0.23RC1 and 7.1.9RC1

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Release Candidate versions are available in remi-test repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

RPM of PHP version 7.1.9RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 26 or remi-php71-test repository for Fedora 23-25 and Enterprise Linux.

RPM of PHP version 7.0.23RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 25 or remi-php70-test repository for Fedora 23-24 and Enterprise Linux.

PHP version 5.6 is now in security mode only, so no more RC will be released.

PHP version 7.2 is in development phase, version 7.2.0beta3 is also available.

emblem-notice-24.pngInstallation : read the Repository configuration and choose your version.

Parallel installation of version 7.0 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php70

Parallel installation of version 7.1 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php71

Update of system version 7.0:

yum --enablerepo=remi-php70,remi-php70-test update php*

Update of system version 7.1:

yum --enablerepo=remi-php71,remi-php71-test update php*

Notice: version 7.1.7RC1 is also available in Fedora rawhide (for QA).

emblem-notice-24.pngRC version is usually the same as the final version (no change accepted after RC, exception for security fix).

Software Collections (php70, php71)

Base packages (php)

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Fedora Magazine: 5 apps to install on your Fedora Workstation

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A few weeks ago, Fedora 26 was released. Every release of Fedora brings new updates and new applications into the official software repositories. Whether you were already a Fedora user and upgraded or you are a first-time user, you might be looking for some cool apps to try out on your Fedora 26 Workstation. In this article, we’ll round up five apps that you might not have known were available in Fedora.

Try out a different browser

By default, Fedora includes the Firefox web browser. But in Fedora 25, Chromium (the open source version of Chrome) was packaged into Fedora. You can learn how to start using and install Chromium below.

How to install Chromium in Fedora

Sort and categorize your music

Do you have a Fedora Workstation filled with local music files? When you open it in a music player, is there missing or just straight out wrong metadata? MusicBrainz is the Wikipedia of music metadata, and you can take back control of your music by using Picard. Picard is a tool that works with the MusicBrainz database to pull in correct metadata to sort and organize your music. Learn how to get started with Picard in Fedora Workstation below.

Picard brings order to your music library

Get ready for the eclipse

August 21st is the big day for the total solar eclipse in North America. Want to get a head start by knowing the sky before it starts? You can map out the sky by using Stellarium, an open source planetarium application available in Fedora now. Learn how to install Stellarium before the skies go dark in this article.

Track the night sky with Stellarium on Fedora

Control your camera from Fedora

Have an old camera lying down? Or maybe do you want to upgrade your webcam by using an existing camera? Entangle lets you take control of your camera all from the comfort of your Fedora Workstation. You can even adjust aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings, and more. Check out how to get started with it in this article.

Tether a digital camera using Entangle

Share Fedora with a friend

One of the last things you might need to do with your Fedora Workstation is extend it! With the Fedora Media Writer, you can create a USB stick loaded with any Fedora edition or spin of your choice and share it with a friend. Learn how to start burning your own USB drives in this how-to article below.

How to make a Fedora USB stick

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Peter Czanik: Creating heat maps using the new syslog-ng geoip2 parser

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The new geoip2 parser of syslog-ng 3.11 is not only faster than its predecessor, but can also provide a lot more detailed geographical information about IP addresses. Next to the usual country name and longitude/latitude information, it also provides the continent, time zone, postal code and even county name. Some of these are available in multiple languages. Learn how you can utilize this information by parsing logs from iptables using syslog-ng, storing them to Elasticsearch, and displaying the results in Kibana!

Before you begin

First of all, you need some iptables log messages. In my case, I used logs from my Turris Omnia router. You could use logs from another device running iptables. Alternatively, with a small effort, you can replace iptables with an Apache web server or any other application that saves IP addresses as part of its log message.

You will also need a syslog-ng version that has the new geoip2 parser. The new geoip2 parser was released as part of version 3.11.1.

As syslog-ng packages in Linux distributions do not include the Elasticsearch destination of syslog-ng, you either need to compile it yourself or use one of the unofficial packages, as listed at https://syslog-ng.org/3rd-party-binaries/.

Last but not least, you will also need Elasticsearch and Kibana installed. I used version 5.5.1 of the Elastic stack, but any other version should work just fine.

What is new in GeoIP

The geoip2 parser of syslog-ng uses the maxminddb library to look up geographical information. It is considerably faster than its predecessor and also provides a lot more detailed information.

As usual, the packaging of maxminddb tools is different on different Linux distributions. You need to make sure that a tool to download / update database files is installed, together with the mmdblookup tool. On most distributions you need to use the former at least once as usually only the old type of databases are available packaged. The latter application can help you list what kind of information is available in the database.

Here is a shortened example:

[root@localhost-czp ~]# mmdblookup --file /usr/share/GeoIP/GeoLite2-City.mmdb --ip 1.2.3.4

  {
    "city": 
      {
        "geoname_id": 
          3054643 
        "names": 
          {
            "de": 
              "Budapest" 
            "en": 
              "Budapest" 
            "es": 
              "Budapest" 
            "fr": 
              "Budapest" 
            "ja": 
              "ブダペスト" 
            "pt-BR": 
              "Budapeste" 
            "ru": 
              "Будапешт" 
            "zh-CN": 
              "布达佩斯" 
          }
      }
[...]
    "location": 
      {
        "accuracy_radius": 
          100 
        "latitude": 
          47.500000 
        "longitude": 
          19.083300 
        "time_zone": 
          "Europe/Budapest" 
      }
[...]

As you can see from the above command line, I use the freely available GeoLite2-City database. The commercial variant is also supported by syslog-ng, which is more precise and up-to-date.

In my configuration example below, I chose to simply store all available geographical data, but normally that is a waste of resources. You can figure out the hierarchy of names based on the JSON output of mmdblookup.

Configure Elasticsearch

The installation and configuration of Elasticsearch and Kibana are beyond the scope of this blog. The only thing I want to note here is that before sending logs from syslog-ng to Elasticsearch, you have to configure mapping for geo information.

If you follow my configuration examples below, you can use the following mapping. I use “syslog-ng” as the index name.

{
   "mappings" : {
      "_default_" : {
         "properties" : {
            "geoip2" : {
               "properties" : {
                  "location2" : {
                     "type" : "geo_point"
                  }
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }
}

Configure syslog-ng

Complete these steps to get your syslog-ng ready for creating heat maps:

1. First of all, you need some logs. In my test environment I receive iptables logs from my router over a TCP connection to port 514. These are filtered on the sender side, so no other logs are included. If you do not have filtered logs, in most cases you can filter for firewall logs based on the program name.

source s_tcp {
  tcp(ip("0.0.0.0") port("514"));
};

2. Process log messages. The first step of processing is using the key-value parser. It creates name-value pairs from the content of the message. You can store all or part of these name-value pairs in a database and search them at a field level instead of the whole message. A prefix for the name is used to make sure that the names do not overlap.

parser p_kv {kv-parser(prefix("kv.")); };

The source IP of the attacker is stored into the kv.SRC name-value pair.

3. Let’s analyze the kv.SRC name-value pair further, using the geoip2 parser. As usual, we use a prefix to avoid any naming problems. Note that the location of the database might be different on your system.

parser p_geoip2 { geoip2( "${kv.SRC}", prefix( "geoip2." ) database( "/usr/share/GeoIP/GeoLite2-City.mmdb" ) ); };

4. The next step is necessary to ensure that location information is in the form expected by Elasticsearch. It looks slightly more complicated than for the first version of the GeoIP parser as there is more information available and information is now structured.

rewrite r_geoip2 {
    set(
        "${geoip2.location.latitude},${geoip2.location.longitude}",
        value( "geoip2.location2" ),
        condition(not "${geoip2.location.latitude}" == "")
    );
};

5. In the Elasticsearch destination we assume that both the cluster and index names are “syslog-ng”. We set the flush-limit to a low value as we do not expect a high message rate. A low flush-limit makes sure that we see logs in Kibana in near real-time. By default, it is set to a much higher value, which is perfect for performance. Unfortunately, timeout is not implemented in the Java destinations so with the default setting and low message rate, you might need to wait an hour before anything shows up in Elasticsearch.

destination d_elastic {
 elasticsearch2 (
  cluster("syslog-ng")
  client-mode("http")
  index("syslog-ng")
  type("test")
  flush-limit("1")
  template("$(format-json --scope rfc5424 --scope nv-pairs --exclude DATE --key ISODATE)")
 )
};

6. Finally we need a log statement which connects all of these building blocks together:

log {
  source(s_tcp);
  parser(p_kv);
  parser(p_geoip2);
  rewrite(r_geoip2);
  destination(d_elastic);
};

Configuration to copy & paste

To make your life easier, I compiled these configuration snippets in one place for better copy & paste experience. You should append it to your syslog-ng.conf or place it in a separate .conf file under /etc/syslog-ng/conf.d/ if supported by your Linux distribution.

source s_tcp {
  tcp(ip("0.0.0.0") port("514"));
};

parser p_kv {kv-parser(prefix("kv.")); };

parser p_geoip2 { geoip2( "${kv.SRC}", prefix( "geoip2." ) database( "/usr/share/GeoIP/GeoLite2-City.mmdb" ) ); };

rewrite r_geoip2 {
    set(
        "${geoip2.location.latitude},${geoip2.location.longitude}",
        value( "geoip2.location2" ),
        condition(not "${geoip2.location.latitude}" == "")
    );
};

destination d_elastic {
 elasticsearch2 (
  cluster("syslog-ng")
  client-mode("http")
  index("syslog-ng")
  type("test")
  flush-limit("1")
  template("$(format-json --scope rfc5424 --scope nv-pairs --exclude DATE --key ISODATE)")
 )
};

log {
  source(s_tcp);
  parser(p_kv);
  parser(p_geoip2);
  rewrite(r_geoip2);
  destination(d_elastic);
};

Visualize your data

By now you have configured syslog-ng to parse iptables logs, added geographical information to them, and stored the results in Elasticsearch. The next step is to verify if logs arrive to Elasticsearch. You should see messages in Kibana where many field names start with “kv.” and “geoip2.”

Once you verified that logs are arriving to Elasticsearch, you can start creating some visualizations. There are numerous tutorials on how to do it by Elastic and others.

You can see a world map below visualizing the IP addresses that attempt to connect to my router. You can easily create such a map just by clicking on the “geoip2.location2” field in the “Available fields” list in Kibana, and then clicking on the “Visualize” button when it appears below the field name.

world map
Map of IP addresses from attempted connections.

Even if I left out many details, this blog is now quite lengthy so I am going to point you to some further reading:

If you have questions or comments related to syslog-ng, do not hesitate to contact us. You can reach us by email or you can even chat with us. For a long list of possibilities, check our contact page at https://syslog-ng.org/contact-us/. On Twitter, I am available as @PCzanik.

The post Creating heat maps using the new syslog-ng geoip2 parser appeared first on Balabit Blog.

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5 apps to install on your Fedora Workstation

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A few weeks ago, Fedora 26 was released. Every release of Fedora brings new updates and new applications into the official software repositories. Whether you were already a Fedora user and upgraded or you are a first-time user, you might be looking for some cool apps to try out on your Fedora 26 Workstation. In this article, we’ll round up five apps that you might not have known were available in Fedora.

Try out a different browser

By default, Fedora includes the Firefox web browser. But in Fedora 25, Chromium (the open source version of Chrome) was packaged into Fedora. You can learn how to start using and install Chromium below.

How to install Chromium in Fedora

Sort and categorize your music

Do you have a Fedora Workstation filled with local music files? When you open it in a music player, is there missing or just straight out wrong metadata? MusicBrainz is the Wikipedia of music metadata, and you can take back control of your music by using Picard. Picard is a tool that works with the MusicBrainz database to pull in correct metadata to sort and organize your music. Learn how to get started with Picard in Fedora Workstation below.

Picard brings order to your music library

Get ready for the eclipse

August 21st is the big day for the total solar eclipse in North America. Want to get a head start by knowing the sky before it starts? You can map out the sky by using Stellarium, an open source planetarium application available in Fedora now. Learn how to install Stellarium before the skies go dark in this article.

Track the night sky with Stellarium on Fedora

Control your camera from Fedora

Have an old camera lying down? Or maybe do you want to upgrade your webcam by using an existing camera? Entangle lets you take control of your camera all from the comfort of your Fedora Workstation. You can even adjust aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings, and more. Check out how to get started with it in this article.

Tether a digital camera using Entangle

Share Fedora with a friend

One of the last things you might need to do with your Fedora Workstation is extend it! With the Fedora Media Writer, you can create a USB stick loaded with any Fedora edition or spin of your choice and share it with a friend. Learn how to start burning your own USB drives in this how-to article below.

How to make a Fedora USB stick

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Alberto Rodriguez (A.K.A bt0): LxQT Test Day: 2017-08-17

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Tuesday, 2017-08-17, is the DNF 2.0 Test Day! As part of this planned Change for Fedora 26, we need your help to test LxQT!

All the instructions are on the wiki page, so please read through and come help us test! As always, the event will be in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC.

Original note here:

LxQT Test Day: 2017-08-17

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Casper: Da FAI

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Pour ceux qui ont des freebox, j’ai trouvé un petit tour rigolo. Si vous êtes comme moi et que vous voulez faire à l’occasion (petites coupures, autres…) des diagnostics rapides de l’ensemble de tous les composants réseau, afficher l’uptime de la freebox dans un terminal en une seule commande va être assurément intéressant.

Vous connaissez sans doute l’adresse pour afficher le rapport complet :

http://mafreebox.free.fr/pub/fbx_info.txt

Donc on peut déjà afficher le rapport complet dans un terminal :

casper@falcon ~ % export FBX=http://mafreebox.free.fr/pub/fbx_info.txt
casper@falcon ~ % curl $FBX

C’est un début mais ça floode encore pas mal le terminal, on peut faire mieux…

casper@falcon ~ % curl $FBX 2>/dev/null | grep "mise en route" | cut -d " " -f10,11,12,13
4 heures, 33 minutes

Bon, j’ai rien inventé, mais j’espère que cette astuce vous sera utile un jour. N’hésitez pas à mettre un pouce vert, un com’, tout ce que vous voulez, et surtout de vous abonner pour être automatiquement averti de la sortie d’une nouvelle vidéo !

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Fedora Badges: New badge: Badger Padawan !

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Badger PadawanYou attended a Fedora Badges workshop! May the badger be with you…

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